Fundraising

Fundraising for your Park Project

from placingparks.ca

Looking for funds to make art in your local park? Not sure where to start? Funding for arts-based community engagement in parks and public spaces comes from a range of sources, meaning that you may need to get creative even at this stage in your process. Here are some tips on raising funds for your project.


1. Think outside your sector

While it can be time-consuming, it’s useful to scan grant opportunities from a range of sectors to see how your project might fit with their criteria. Some arts councils and foundations, like the Toronto Arts Council (TAC), have developed specific grants and supports for artists who want to work in parks or public spaces. TAC’s Animating Toronto’s Parks grant offers both money and support with city permits. Other local arts councils have community arts or community engagement granting programs, which your project may be eligible for. Beyond arts funding, you may also be able to apply for federal funding from government ministries at both the provincial and federal levels. MABELLEarts’ national project, Welcome to This Place (2018), for example, was funded by the Department of Canadian Heritage Inter-Action program; a fund designed to strengthen the Canadian social fabric and foster intercultural understanding. It’s also worth looking at funds specifically allotted for: youth engagement; immigrants and refugees; seniors, and other specific demographics. The important role that participatory art and culture-making can play in fostering healthy communities is increasingly recognized outside of the arts sector. Micro or “seed” grants (small parcels of money) may also be suitable for your first project. Park People, a national organization that supports communities to enliven parks, sometimes offers such grants, and other local organizations may do so as well. Look far and wide for such opportunities!


2. Do it early

See Earthand Gleaner’s “Welcome To This Place” project in action!

Given the research involved in finding funds and the work that goes into writing grant applications, it’s a good idea to look for funds early. Sharon Kallis, artistic director of Vancouver’s EartHand Gleaners Society, explains that her company typically looks for funds two or even three years in advance of the projects they undertake. This allows her to plan properly and put all of the necessary supports in place well in advance of each project. It’s also important to note that funds from arts councils and government are typically posted 6 months to a year out from the expected start date of a project. There is often a wait time of 3-6 months while applications are reviewed.


3. Don’t underestimate

A final tip for fundraising is to not underestimate your costs. MABELLEarts thinks through all of the potential costs for each of its projects and matches these costs with funding opportunities. Of course, anticipating potential costs comes with experience. A number of Welcome to this Place partners commented on the extra resources required to support newcomers to Canada to participate in their programming. Transportation to and from parks was a significant cost, as was food and outreach. As Sharon Kallis, from EartHand Gleaners Society put it: “If I look to writing grants to engage with newcomers again, I will be much clearer in understanding what is required in order to deliver a project successfully. This mini project was an excellent learning opportunity and test run.”


 
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Do you want more tools, tips and insights for creating your own community-engaged projects in public spaces? Visit Placing Parks to learn more and explore our project archive and toolkit! We hope Placing Parks helps you envision artful projects that bring people together in your local park! 

www.placingparks.ca

 

Mabelle Park Residency 2019

Welcome Val T. Vint

Mabelle Park Artist in Residence 2019

Val Vint performs at Welcome To This PLace in Broadacres PArk (summer 2018)

Val Vint performs at Welcome To This PLace in Broadacres PArk (summer 2018)

MABELLEarts is over-the-moon to welcome Public Artist and Knowledge Keeper Val T. Vint to the Mabelle Park for three weeks of planting and teaching about native plants, combined with a community-engaged natural fence weaving process.  


Born in Winnipegosis, Manitoba, Val draws from a background of photography, ceramics, painting, engineering, design, theatre, performance art, music, travel and work with other Indigenous Peoples. Val has also been a (traditional) drum-carrier for 40+ years and teaches cultural arts.  

Read more about Val’s most recent public space project in for the Forks (Winnipeg) here

And stay tuned for more info about opportunities to join in workshops with Val and other MABELLEartists - coming soon!

Cooking for Mabelle Iftar Nights

Cooking at Mabelle Iftar Nights

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Community festivity is a big part of the life of our company at MABELLEarts: all of our workshops, events, gatherings, celebrations and production times are made more exciting and meaningful by the inclusion of delicious food. In all of our work, we strive to weave beauty into every detail - from the art materials we choose to the food we serve and how we set the tables. Part of the beauty of the food we create comes from the collaborative effort of the the local women who together prepare it for their community.

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The Mabelle Ladies Cooking Circle involves a group of women who come together to share recipes and traditions while feeding the neighbourhood. Each receive an honorarium for their participation. Originally developed by Miriam Ahmed, the Mabelle Ladies Cooking Circle is now coordinated by Mabelle resident, Fadwa Ghanem. Every year, during Ramadan, this group of Mabelle women come together to prepare snacks and treats to share with their neighbours at sundown during Mabelle Iftar Nights.

This year, thanks to support from The Toronto Pearson Airport (Propellor Project), we are pleased to welcome Joshna Maharaj as our Kitchen Consultant for The Mabelle Ladies Cooking Circle. Joshna is a chef and activist who “works with communities, organizations and institutions to build value-based food services that prioritize good food, hospitality and sustainability”. Joshna believes that “chefs can help people and communities transform with stronger connections to their food”. She uses “social gastronomy to rebuild our food system, increase people's access to good food and help everyone have more fun in the kitchen.”

Joshna has worked with institutions including The Stop Community Food Centre, The Scarborough Hospital, and The Gladstone Hotel (as executive chef). She has spoken all over Canada and beyond, including at TEDxToronto, U of T, Food Secure Canada and The Parabere Forum (Barcelona). Reflecting on her recent work alongside Fadwa and The Mabelle Ladies Cooking Circle, Joshna says:

“I spent the afternoon making spinach & feta fatayer with an awesome group of women from five different countries, speaking as many languages. As we folded these little pockets, we talked about life in Canada, having children and where to get the best spices. This is easily one of my favourite ways to spend an afternoon.”

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Joshna Maharaj (Kitchen Consultant) and Fadwa Ghanem (Cooking Cordinator) meet in the MABELLEarts office to plan the menu for Mabelle Iftar Nights, prepared each week by the Mabelle Ladies Cooking Circle.

Read more about Joshna’s work at:
www.joshnamaharaj.com
@joshnamaharaj

Fadwa’s Hummus Recipe: enjoy at home!

Each Iftar Night, Fadwa, Joshna and the Mabelle Ladies Cooking Circle have been preparing Fadwa’s signature hummus recipe to serve for Iftar. Now you can make and enjoy this delicious dish at home!

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Ingredients:
•  2 Cups of Canned Chickpeas
•  4 Tablespoons Tahini
•  1 Lemon (juice)
•  2 Cloves of Garlic
•  Salt
•  Olive oil
•  Chickpeas
•  Paprika
•  Chopped parsley

Directions:

            1. Rinse the chickpeas in cold water and place into food processor.
            2. Add 4 tablespoons of water (or as much as needed until smooth).
            3. Add the tahini, crushed garlic, salt, and lemon juice into mixture.
            4. When the mixture is fully combined and smooth, add to serving dish.
            5. Drizzle extra virgin olive oil and decorate with a few whole chickpeas.
            6. Sprinkle with a pinch of paprika and finely chopped parsley leaves for colour.

 

 

Join us for our final Mabelle Iftar Night on Thursday May 30th to enjoy treats and snacks prepared by Fadwa, Joshna and The Mabelle Ladies Cooking Circle!

Event details here

 

Project Design

Tips for Designing a Community-Engaged Project in a Park or Public Space

from placingparks.ca

Do you have an idea for a community event or workshop series? A park you’d like to enliven through artmaking? A social issue or community tension that you’d like to address? Whatever your starting point, here are some important things to think about when designing a creative project for a park or public space.


1.  Make it Place Based

Artistic Director, Leah Houston, shares her step-by-step process for designing a community-engaged textile project, produced in Broadacres Park in partnership with The Arab Community Centre of Toronto in 2019

Whether you’re starting with a creative concept or a park you want to work in, at some point the two have to come together. Every place has its own unique topography, history and social dynamics, and all of these are important to consider in the initial stages of project design. Whose traditional territories does the park sit on? Who are the communities in the surrounding area? Will the activities and aesthetics you offer appeal to range of local groups? Who currently feels welcome in the park? Who doesn’t? Which parts of the park are already actively used and how?

These are just some of the many questions to ask when designing a project for a park or public space. While you might draw inspiration and ideas from other successful community art projects elsewhere, designing your project with your specific park in mind will ultimately make it more meaningful and inclusive. Not only are you likely to have better attendance and participation in your events, making your project place-based will also help you anticipate challenges before they arise.


2. Think Big

Toronto-based community theatre company, Clay and Paper Theatre, have given themselves an earnest but also tongue-in-cheek mandate, which is to “Change the world. Completely. Irrevocably”. This company has been working successfully in Toronto’s Dufferin Grove Park for over 20 years, offering summer productions, an annual participatory parade, hands-on workshops and more. While their stated goal is intentionally grandiose and may not be in keeping with your style or tone, this kind of big-picture thinking guides their work in important ways. It keeps the context they’re working in and the social systems that they’d like to change top-of-mind. It also helps communicate to audiences and funders why their work is important. These aren’t just playful or beautiful productions—they are meaningful events that are pivotal to community life.

Thinking big is a different process for everyone. Whether it’s envisioning what you’d like your events to look like in 5 years, dreaming of future positive interactions between neighbours, or focusing on a specific goal like making youth feel welcome in your park, it’s useful to think big about the why of your project.


3. Think Small

Planning and logistics are extra important when working in public spaces, as there are lots of players involved and many things that can go wrong. This is why thinking “small” is just as important as thinking big. MABELLEarts is well served by developing specific workshop plans, with lists of the supplies and people-power needed for each step. We develop precise facilitation notes so we can invite anyone who shows up to participate. We also draft backup plans for changes in weather or other logistical hurdles. Developing these plans in the design phase can be very helpful, even though your precise plans are likely to change as you meet participants and discover their interests and needs.


4. Consider the Surrounding Community

Who lives in the park’s immediate environs or even in the park itself? What cultural/identity groups do they belong to? How does the surrounding community currently use the park? Will your project augment that use or disrupt it? How will sound carry from your project out into the neighbourhood? What will neighbours see from their balconies or porches? Will the local community benefit from your project?  Designing your project with the surrounding community in mind and directly inviting them to participate will mitigate tensions and help you avoid last-minute complaints from residents. If you want your project to be inclusive and welcoming, we advise assessing community needs while you’re still in the planning phase. What will participants need to comfortably and fully participate? Remember that your needs assessment shouldn’t only be about people you already work with, but also about the people you aspire to work with—whether that’s residents of a particular building, or a specific cultural group or age bracket.


 
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Do you want more tools, tips and insights for creating your own community-engaged projects in public spaces? Visit Placing Parks to learn more and explore our project archive and toolkit! We hope Placing Parks helps you envision artful projects that bring people together in your local park! 

www.placingparks.ca



 

Community Arts & The Settlement Process

How community arts can play a vital role in the settlement process

By Mugoli Samba (MABELLEarts Intern, 2019)

Watch this video to see The Welcome To This Place project in action in Haliafax (Summer, 2018)

Welcoming new neighbours is a beautiful thing: when we welcome people with open arms, arrival can turn into an opportunity for new relationships to bloom. As our neighbourhoods continue to be enriched by immigration, Community Arts professionals have a unique opportunity to partake in the settlement process; by providing artful opportunities for human connection. Last summer, we experienced this firsthand in a Halifax park.

According to Eryn Foster, “parks, public spaces and art are absolutely integral, I think, to the settlement process.” Forster was the project coordinator for one our projects in Halifax last summer.

Nova Scotia welcomed “more newcomers than ever before” in 2018, with about eight in 10 landed immigrants settling in its capital city, Halifax. When we approached Eryn with the idea of organizing an activity that would foster social inclusion for newcomers, she knew the city would be fertile ground.

MABELLEarts collaborated with ISANS (Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia) to offer a program of free art workshops, community gatherings and related arts-based activities at Glen Garden, as well as other locations around the City of Halifax. The project culminated in an art installation that was presented as part of the Nocturne festival in the city’s downtown core.

We asked Eryn a few questions about Welcome To This Place Halifax.

How do you feel parks, public spaces and art can play a role in the settlement process?

Parks, public spaces and art are absolutely integral, I think, to the settlement process. What I learned working with ISANS and as part of this project was how community gardens in particular are such an important place. It is here where newcomers can feel connected to their new surrounding by literally putting down roots in soil. It is a community space, a space to socialize, a place where children can play and meet other children from within and outside of the newcomer community. It is a place to grow food and a sense of one’s creativity. Having a space where everyone is welcome, and where you can be outside of your home, enjoying green space and just being involved with the world, is what I think helps people to settle in. And making art of course is fun, and relaxing and I also think, that creativity is something that helps people to feel productive and inspired.

What was the biggest thing you learned during this project?

“To help people feel warm, welcomed, and comfortable in any new surrounding or situation, provide them with the things that help them to feel secure.”

Of course there are many things I learned. But one of the key things, which I mentioned already, is really just the importance of collaboration. I had not yet had the experience of working with the Newcomer community in Halifax, and so I knew to create a successful program, we needed to find a group who already had the connections. We didn’t want to spend all of this time and resources coordinating something when we didn’t really have access or already established connections to the communities we wanted to reach out to. As an artist myself, I have learned many times over of the importance of collaboration. When you can focus on the things that you are good at, and the things where you have the most expertise, then whatever you are doing can be further supported by the expertise of what others are able to bring to the table.

What kind of resources did ISANS bring to the table in the project?

I think collaboration is absolutely a necessary ingredient for success with a project like Welcome To This Place. We certainly could not have done the project on our own, and together, we could each bring different types of resources, expertise, perspectives, etc to the table. There is also so much more potential for learning and growing. Just to give an example, in terms of outreach, I would not have known the nest ways to find people to participate in our program. As it turned out, it was a slightly complicated process, one that involved lots of individual phone calls and translators, but it was also the outreach strategy that worked. We had incredible turn out for every one of our events.

If there was one thing about working with newcomers that you thought would be important to share, what would it be?

I think the most important things are really pretty common sense. To help people feel warm, welcomed, and comfortable in any new surrounding or situation, provide them with the things that help them to feel secure. Food for instance is so important, and providing refreshments and snacks and sometimes full meals was a way for us to build trust and connection. Also, we really learned the importance of having translators at all of our events. There was definitely a language barrier with many of those participating on our events and the translators were absolutely essential for us to have good communication.

•••

Eryn Foster is a Halifax-based interdisciplinary artist, filmmaker, curator and community arts organizer. She is actively involved with a number of local arts organizations including VANS (Visual Arts Nova Scotia), the Atlantic Filmmakers Cooperative and Hermes Art Gallery. Foster received her BFA from Concordia University in Montreal and her MFA from the University of Guelph and has recently also studied documentary film at Capilano University in Montreal. 

 
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Ready to launch your own art initiative? Visit placingparks.ca or more practical advice on organizing, seeking funding, and policy talking points for your municipality. We hope Placing Parks helps you envision artful projects that bring people together in your local park!

 

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Guest Author: Mugoli Samba

Mugoli recently graduated with a BA in journalism and African studies from Carleton University, and spent some time in the world of communications and media. Her storytelling skills have taken her from coastal Haiti to spending ten days sailing across the St. Lawrence River for Radio-Canada Québec. She has interned with the Windsor Star and most recently worked as an assistant digital editor with the United Church Observer Magazine. She completed an internship with MABELLEarts in 2019, thanks to funding from the Cultural Human Resources Council.

Using community arts to build youth social capital

Using community arts to build
youth social capital

By Mugoli Samba (MABELLEarts Intern, 2019)

Farah, Leah, Omar, Osama, Tauhid and Tasmeen, 2011

Farah, Leah, Omar, Osama, Tauhid and Tasmeen, 2011

One day, the children MABELLEarts had been working with for nearly 11 years woke up as teenagers who were seeking volunteer hours or employment. And while this was an opportunity for MABELLEarts to acquire some helping hands — it does get chaotic at times! — founder and Artistic Director Leah Houston saw it as an opportunity to transform our programming and expand our mission.

Farah, Leah, Omar, Osama, Tauhid and Tasmeen, 2018 (photo: Liam Coo)

Farah, Leah, Omar, Osama, Tauhid and Tasmeen, 2018 (photo: Liam Coo)

“Building social capital is actually the purpose of the entire program,” says Leah, who created the MABELLELeaders program for this new generation of participants. “Youth who are racialized and come from low-income backgrounds often aren’t accessing the same opportunities as white affluent or middle class Canadians.” As a community arts organization, Leah believed MABELLEarts could help fill that gap.

According to a study by the University of Windsor’s School of Social Work, social capital is a “determinant of the successful transition of youth into adult society.” Through relationships and networks, social capital can “provide access to valuable resources and information (…) that youth may not have access to through traditional means.”

The MABELLELeaders program has become one of the backbones of our programming because we believe lasting work does not end with workshops. Here are some tips and examples to help you consider ways your own organization could intentionally help foster youth social capital.

1) Identify skills that can be useful

MABELLELeaders and youth understand the realities of being a newcomer or an asylum seeker in Canada. “They know what it’s like to leave a place and begin a new life in a new country,” says Leah, “because for many of them, that is an experience they or their family members have lived first-hand.”

Take some time to consider how your youth’s lived experience can translate into employable skills and assets, regardless of what their background is or where they would like to work in the future. In the case of MABELLELeaders, this often included:

  • A sensibility and openness to people from all walks of life

  • Intergenerational communication skills, that often comes with the experience of acting as an interpreter for one’s own parents

  • Multilingual skills

  • Caring skills, that often comes from family responsibilities

  • Ability to adapt to new environments and to learn quickly

  • Budget managing skills

2) Turn participation into volunteer opportunities

In 2017, youth Volunteers came together with MABELLE artists & staff to play a key role in planning and hosting Iftar Nights in Mabelle Park.

At MABELLEarts, we are happy to provide youth with volunteer opportunities whenever they arise. The skillset we’ve outlined above is particularly relevant and useful to the work our organization does. The volunteer opportunities we offer range from general help during workshops, to on-site translation during public activities, working closely with senior participant who may have mobility problems, or helping us with community outreach.

We try our best to provide opportunities that allow program participants to go out into the community and meet new people — people who might become new friends, new contacts, or even new mentors. Don’t be scared to get your youth involved in programming that involves some travel, as this is one of the best ways for them to meet people from schools or organizations that may be new to them. However, do make sure that you can provide travel, or travel stipends, if possible.

3) Offer meaningful job opportunities

“Employment programs are a mechanism for providing youth with workforce exposure and skill development in the absence of market opportunities. These programs are also a potential source of social capital, through the exposure to new environments and the development of relationships and networks that can provide resources that youth may not have access to through traditional means.” - School of Social Work, University of Windsor

Tap into resources like Canada Summer Jobs funding for paid youth employment opportunities. Try and find interesting ways of turning the roles into meaningful employment opportunities that help them expand both their networks and their resumes.

Last summer, MABELLEarts launched Welcome To This Place — a national project that used arts in public spaces to promote social inclusion for newcomers. Our project took place in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montreal, and Halifax, and we took some of our MABELLELEaders along with us for the ride! It was an opportunity for them to see new parts of the country, expand their networks, challenge themselves, and apply their skills in new environments.

4) Keep adapting your program

One day, the teens who were seeking volunteer hours and summer jobs started sharing their post-secondary dreams. As an organization that grows with the community it serves, it felt like a natural progression of things to offer support to students who were interested in applying for post-secondary education.

Youth are invited to drop by the office or set-up meetings for anything ranging from advice to sit-down sessions, where we help them apply for scholarships, prepare them for interviews, or help them with their application package.

Another challenge, Leah adds, is that “they’re not always meeting people in professions they’d be interested in, and not always getting a sense of all the different ways there are to have a job.”  

Community arts professionals often come from a wide range of backgrounds. Leah, for instance, has a background in environmental sciences. Our Managing Director, Karen Kew, has a background in community radio, accounting, and management. Former interns have been journalists (like myself), teachers, and much more. Don’t be scared to tap into your networks and see if there are people who’d be willing to offer advice, go for coffee, or even drop by your office to meet with some of the youth.


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Guest Author: Mugoli Samba

Mugoli recently graduated with a BA in journalism and African studies from Carleton University, and spent some time in the world of communications and media. Her storytelling skills have taken her from coastal Haiti to spending ten days sailing across the St. Lawrence River for Radio-Canada Québec. She has interned with the Windsor Star and most recently worked as an assistant digital editor with the United Church Observer Magazine. She spent time with MABELLEyouth while completing an internship with MABELLEarts in 2019, thanks to funding from the Cultural Human Resources Council.

Mabelle Iftar Nights 2019

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Join Mabelle neighbours and artists as we pass the hours leading to sunset with art-making, songs, gardening, and a cooking-fire.

Thursday May 9th 7:30 - 9:30: at 5005 Dundas Street West

Thursdays May 16, May 23, May 30th 7:30 - 9:30:
in
Mabelle Park across from 49 Mabelle Ave | directions here

Every year, MABELLEarts works with community members of all ages and backgrounds to create inter-cultural celebrations that mark the holy month of Ramadan.  On Thursday evenings, residents from a range of cultural backgrounds gather in the Mabelle Park to make art and join their Muslim neighbours as they break their Ramadan fast. Light refreshments served at sunset. Free - everyone welcome! 


Guest artists: 
Hussein Janmohamed, Maryem Tollar with Turkwaz, Shadowland Theatre, The Gather Round Singers - and more TBA!

Supported by: 
Toronto Pearson Airport (Propellor Project)
Toronto Arts Council
Ontario Arts Council
The Government of Canada
The Catherine Donnelly Foundation

 

Find out what else is coming up this summer in Mabelle and Broadacres Park here!

 

The Art of Hosting 

The Art of Hosting

from placingparks.ca

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Hosting is at the core of our work at MABELLEarts and we consider it an art form unto itself. We learned much of this from mentor Ruth Howard, the founding artistic director of Jumblies Theatre whose work has influenced community-engaged artists across the country.

Artful hosting is particularly important when you’ve made it a priority to involve traditionally under-served groups in your programming. MABELLEarts national project Welcome to this Place focused on working with a range of artists and organizations across Canada to involve newcomers to Canada in arts-based programming in urban parks and public spaces.  There are many groups facing systemic barriers to participation in cultural activities and events and a key part of your job is to help them feel genuinely invited, welcomed and included.  


1.  Make it beautiful and exciting

MABELLEarts strives to weave beauty into every detail - from the art materials we choose to the food we serve and how we set the tables. This attention to detail requires being well-organized and prepared—especially when working in parks and outdoor places that are not necessarily equipped to create beautiful art. Working in parks has often meant creating a beautiful and fully-functional art studio literally from the ground up—a task that takes formidable planning and forethought. Detailed packing lists, workshop plans, an articulated order of events and lots of set-up time are all tools we use to achieve a beautiful outcome. The result is that participants feel they have taken part in and contributed to something worthy of their time and energy.  Here are some key questions we consider when planning a workshop or event:

Materials:

  • Describe the kinds of materials you plan to use.

  • Why have you chosen these materials?

  • How do you anticipate them impacting the process and final product?

  • How much of each material will you require?

Influences and Inspiration:

  • Are there specific cultural or artistic traditions that have helped inspire the idea?

  • Have you compiled any source material to help further articulate the idea or inspire activities?

  • How does your choice of materials impact or support your core idea?

Creation Process and Logistics:

How will new materials and activities be introduced as the process unfolds?

  • How will participants be oriented on how to effectively use the materials?

  • What (if any) safety concerns should be considered?

  • How should the workshop space be set up?

  • What else is needed, i.e.: easels or lapboards? Plastic sheeting for tables?  Smocks?  Brushes? Pastels?  Etc.

  • Can participants take home the work they make?

Collaboration with Artists:

  • Will other artists be collaborating with you or advising you on this project?

  • If yes, what role(s) will they play?

Collaboration with Community Members:

  • Will participants focus on creating individual works?

  • What creative role will you play in collaboration with participants?

  • Will the members create individual pieces, a shared piece or a bit of both?

  • Are there any needs or constraints that participants may have that you should consider?

Final Product(s):

  • What will your role and artistic contribution be in shaping the final product?

  • Does the final product have an audience?

  • If yes, where and how will the work be shown/experienced?

  • What role will participants play?

  • -What is next life of object? Disposed? Hung? Anything to consider here?

Documentation:

  • What is the most appropriate form of documentation for the project, i.e.: photography, video, audio etc.

  • How can these forms document the process?  The product


2. Introduce yourself!

When someone is new to your activity or event, make sure you introduce yourself, get their contact information and welcome them heartily.  At MABELLEarts, community leaders play an important role in welcoming participants—going around to each participant to say hello.  We use this moment of welcoming as a way to gather statistical information (something our funders require) provided our guest is willing to share their name and contact information, which is collected on a standard attendance form and then inputted into a database so we can keep in touch, provided we’ve been given permission to do so.


3. Improvise

At the end of the day, all the planning and attention to detail will not prepare you for the many unpredictable aspects of making art in parks.  Perhaps over 100 people of all ages show up to a workshop you anticipated 20 adults would attend.  Maybe a local summer camp of 5 to 10 year olds drops by during your seniors painting group. These opportunities invite us to create on the fly - to find the unexpected beauty in the chaos.


 

Do you want more tools, tips and insights for creating your own community-engaged projects in public spaces? Visit Placing Parks to learn more and explore our project archive and toolkit! We hope Placing Parks helps you envision artful projects that bring people together in your local park! 

www.placingparks.ca

 

Coming Up in Summer 2019

 

We're so excited to share our plans for Summer 2019 in Mabelle and Broadacres Parks!

Save the date: we hope you'll join us!

Iftar Nights
May 9, 16, 23 & 30th 7:30-9:30 in Mabelle Park
directions here
more info here

Artist Residency with Val T. Vint
May 27 - June 17th in Mabelle Park

Take My Hand
Afternoon Workshops: July 8-12 & July 23 - 26 Celebration: July 27th all
in Broadacres Park

MABELLE Nights
A series of performative night markets on Mabelle Avenue
August 1, 8, 15 & 22th in Mabelle Park

Follow along for more news and updates all summer long!

Summer Jobs with MABELLEarts

We're hiring two Community Arts Coordinators!

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Job Title: Community Arts Coordinator
Date Posted: April 26, 2019
Application Deadline:  Sunday, May 5, 2019 at 5pm
Salary: $18/hr 30 hours/week
Region: Etobicoke
Term: 16 weeks (Monday, May 13 to Friday, August 30)
Number of Positions: 2

MABELLEarts is a community arts organization that brings together people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities to make art, tell stories and creatively transform public spaces. We are seeking two Community Arts Coordinators to join our team of artists, arts professionals, architects, community leaders, builders and gardeners for an exciting summer of art and neighbourhood transformation.

Who We’re Looking For

We’re seeking two emerging leaders with a demonstrated interest in arts programming and youth engagement to lead two teams of youth in delivering arts-based programming in two Etobicoke parks. You are a highly-responsible self-starter with demonstrated experience working with youth from a range of cultural backgrounds. Your lived experience is a match with youth participants who are predominately low-income, racialized, newcomer youth and/or you bring demonstrated experience in working with these communities.

Job Description

Under the Direction of the artistic team and management of the Manager of Programs, the Community Arts Coordinators will lead a team of youth employees and volunteers ages 15 to 21 to deliver arts-based programming and supporting a team of professional artists and hundreds of community members to realize community arts projects through July and August.

Areas of Responsibility

Community Programs (30%): implement programs for participants of all ages (some program design may be part of this role); manage workshop logistics, materials, supplies and snacks and support visiting artists. Assist with community outreach and social media.

Youth Engagement (50%): provide supervision, management, and mentorship to youth employees and volunteers; provide support and deliver training to ensure success of youth employees and volunteers and the development of an equitable working environment; track youth hours and attendance; manage logistics related to transportation, schedules.

Large-Scale Projects (20%): support as needed with large scale summer projects, including assisting with workshop facilitation and the creation of original artwork/performance elements and provide logistical and community engagement support.

Requirements:
- Youth engagement and leadership experience
- Willingness to learn from and teach others and openness to feedback
- A demonstrated interest in arts management and community-engaged arts
- Excellent time management and organizational skills
- Ability to work independently and as part of a collaborative team
- Ability to multi-task and work in fast-paced work environment
- Excellent research, record-keeping and administrative skills
- Excellent interpersonal and communication skills
- Social media skills including facility with Facebook, Twitter and Instagram
- Fluency in English (spoken and written)
- Proficiency in a second language is desirable
- A valid G-class driver’s license is a major asset

Funder Requirements

These positions are funded through the Federal government’s Summer Student Program. To be eligible, candidates must:

- Be 15 to 30 years of age at the time of employment.
- Be a Canadian citizen, permanent resident, or person to whom refugee protection has been conferred under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act for the duration of the employment.
- Have a valid Social Insurance Number at the start of employment and be legally entitled to work in Canada in accordance with relevant provincial or territorial legislation and regulations.

How to Apply

To be considered for this position, please email your resume with the subject “Community Arts Coordinator” to karen@mabellearts.ca

Please include a cover letter with your resume. Applications without a cover letter will not be considered.

MABELLEarts encourages applications from all qualified candidates. We’re committed to developing an inclusive workplace with connections in the communities we serve. We encourage candidates from diverse backgrounds, including those who may need accommodation, to apply to join our team. Accommodations are available on request for candidates taking part in all aspects of the selection process.

Our office is located in a Toronto Community Housing high-rise tower that has been equipped with automated entrances and exits, and our washroom is wheelchair accessible.

Thank you for your interest in the position, however we will not be able to provide additional information by phone and will not accept calls related to the position. Only candidates selected for interview will be contacted.

Calling all newcomer artists!

Are you a newcomer artist, craftsperson, architect or designer? Do you want to work on a community arts project?

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MABELLEarts is now accepting applications to join our 2019 Community Arts Training and Artistic team. We are currently looking to expand our our artistic team to reflect the artistic goals of the upcoming programming season and also providing a three-day FREE training for newcomer and immigrant artists from all disciplines.

Training will include:

  • Project design

  • Community Arts practices

  • Engaging communities

  • Professional networking, mentorship and more...

We have 10 training spots available and after training we will have 3 paid spring/summer opportunities as an artistic assistant where you will be provided be mentored by an experienced community artist, network with other newcomers from a range of cultural and artistic backgrounds and be part of projects that engage with the community.

Please email us a cover letter outlining your interest in working in community arts, a resume that highlights your arts experience and link to your website or a portfolio with up to 10 samples of your work.

Please email your application to karen@mabellearts by April 5, 2019 or call 416-239-4900 ext 2. for more info.

These tips will help you design more inclusive art projects in public spaces

These tips will help you design more inclusive art projects in public spaces

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Parks are fertile ground for people to meet and get to know each other across the differences of race, culture, class and ability. Collaborative art making in parks acts as an incredible way to bring people together who may otherwise never meet.  Thinking through how you will welcome, actively include and keep specific cultural communities and groups safe takes pre-planning and the allocation of resources.  Here are some things to consider:


1. Address potential barriers to participation

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Some potential barriers may take financial resources to address, but many can be tackled through creative thinking and the assistance of partners, community leaders and/or volunteers.  What’s essential is thinking through these potential barriers as part of the planning process while also remaining responsive to accessibility needs as they arise.  

At MABELLEarts, we’ve been able to deepen our commitment to accessibility by responding to the needs of participants as they arise.  For example, we began providing pick-ups and visual interpretation when we met Berle - a Mabelle resident who was visually impaired.  We first sought the expertise of an ASL interpreter in 2016 - when we met Johann Fisch - a community leader who lives near Broadacres Park.  

Sometimes we pair participants with a community leader (someone who has taken part in an number of MABELLEarts projects and is now a volunteer or staff) to support them to engage.  These community leaders can assist by providing translation, visual guidance (for those who are visually impaired) and even physical support. Sometimes it can help those who are shy to have someone with them as they get to know the project and what we’re up to.

Other things we think about when considering barriers to participation are:

  1. Cost of admission/participation. You might consider making all your workshops and events free of charge.

  2. Access to childcare, which can include providing satellite activities for kids to ensure that parents can take part.  

  3. Time of day and how that might impact participation.

Some other good resources on accessibility in the arts can be found here.

2. Consider all things safety

There isn’t a one-size-fits-all approach to making everyone feel safe and comfortable in a park or public space setting, but safety and comfort are still important to think about. What will you do if a participant is loud or disruptive? If someone is aggressive? If people who are using drugs or alcohol want to participate? Natalie James, from Winnipeg’s Spence Neighbourhood Association, talks about this last dilemma in her working context:

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“At two of our events there were people who were intoxicated and there was discussion about whether they should be invited and offered a glass of water or some bannock, or told to leave. In the future, I’d like to do some planning in advance, since we know we’re going to encounter this situation again. Is there a creative, arts-based way to make sure everyone feels safe and welcome?”

Part of your job as a project host is to anticipate the dilemmas that could possibly arise in your park and to prepare your team to handle those moments. Talking about inclusion is one thing, but enacting it can be tricky. Decide in advance which behaviours you can accommodate and how you might engage different groups or individuals simultaneously. Decide as well on situations you’ll want to intervene in to ensure the safety and comfort of other participants.  Sexual harassment and racism are pervasive problems that can flare up when working in public spaces.  It’s important to think through how you’ll respond and to work with your collaborators to plan for how you’ll intervene.  


3. Take note of cultural and religious protocols and their relevance

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At MABELLEarts we try to hire artists whose cultural backgrounds and artistic practices align with the communities we work with.  This increases the relevance of what we’re offering and helps make participants feel welcome and included.  It’s also incredibly exciting artistically to work in this way.  

If you are hoping to work with a cultural community that is different than your own, consider seeking cultural interpretation and advice from partners and community leaders.  (We’ve often included this role in our budgeting process to insure we can pay for this service). Understanding religious protocols related to prayer and purification, food and the separation of women and men can help to make observant participants feel more welcome and included.  


4. Recognize community contributions and leadership

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Community art projects are made possible by the people who choose to give of their time and creativity and take part.  Whether for an hour, the full duration of a production phase or over the many years of a long-term project, community members make vital contributions to art in parks and it’s important to acknowledge their efforts.  It can be helpful to think through ways of recognizing community contributions as well as identifying opportunities for participants to benefit from their involvement in your project.  

This is especially true when working with newcomers to Canada who face incredible pressure to gain Canadian experience and find employment.  At MABELLEarts, we see anyone who takes part in our projects as a volunteer and a potential leader.  We publicly acknowledge participants during events, track participation hours, and write letters acknowledging their contributions—which can be helpful with early job-hunting efforts. We’ve offered subway tokens, food and childcare.  With our community leadership program, we provide honoraria to community members who make specific contributions, i.e. by preparing food for workshops and events.  We also employ community members as: workshop assistants and one-on-one facilitators; child-minders; translators, and; cultural interpreters. Sometimes we establish advisory committees to help plan and envision our projects, thereby ensuring that our plans make sense for the people we hope to engage.


 

Do you want more tools, tips and insights for creating your own community-engaged projects in public spaces? Visit Placing Parks to learn more and explore our project archive and toolkit! We hope Placing Parks helps you envision artful projects that bring people together in your local park! 

www.placingparks.ca

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4 things to consider for your creative projects in public spaces

Four Things to Consider for your
Creative Projects in Public Spaces

Do you have an idea for a community event or workshop series? A park you’d like to enliven through artmaking? A social issue or community tension that you’d like to address? Whatever your starting point, here are some important things to think about when designing a creative project for a park or public space (and make sure to check out our new digital resource for more tips).


1. Make it place-based

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Whether you’re starting with a creative concept or a park you want to work in, at some point the two have to come together. Every place has its own unique topography, history and social dynamics, and all of these are important to consider in the initial stages of project design. Whose traditional territories does the park sit on? Who are the communities in the surrounding area? Will the activities and aesthetics you offer appeal to range of local groups? Who currently feels welcome in the park? Who doesn’t? Which parts of the park are already actively used and how?

These are just some of the many questions to ask when designing a project for a park or public space. While you might draw inspiration and ideas from other successful community art projects elsewhere, designing your project with your specific park in mind will ultimately make it more meaningful and inclusive. Not only are you likely to have better attendance and participation in your events, making your project place-based will also help you anticipate challenges before they arise.


2. Think big

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Toronto-based community theatre company, Clay and Paper Theatre, have given themselves an earnest but also tongue-in-cheek mandate, which is to “Change the world. Completely. Irrevocably”.

This company has been working successfully in Toronto’s Dufferin Grove Park for over 20 years, offering summer productions, an annual participatory parade, hands-on workshops and more. While their stated goal is intentionally grandiose and may not be in keeping with your style or tone, this kind of big-picture thinking guides their work in important ways. It keeps the context they’re working in and the social systems that they’d like to change top-of-mind. It also helps communicate to audiences and funders why their work is important. These aren’t just playful or beautiful productions—they are meaningful events that are pivotal to community life.

Thinking big is a different process for everyone. Whether it’s envisioning what you’d like your events to look like in 5 years, dreaming of future positive interactions between neighbours, or focusing on a specific goal like making youth feel welcome in your park, it’s useful to think big about the why of your project.


3. Think small

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Planning and logistics are extra important when working in public spaces, as there are lots of players involved and many things that can go wrong. This is why thinking “small” is just as important as thinking big.

MABELLEarts is well served by developing specific workshop plans, with lists of the supplies and people-power needed for each step. We develop precise facilitation notes so we can invite anyone who shows up to participate. We also draft backup plans for changes in weather or other logistical hurdles. Developing these plans in the design phase can be very helpful, even though your precise plans are likely to change as you meet participants and discover their interests and needs.


4. Surrounding Community

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Who lives in the park’s immediate environs or even in the park itself? What cultural/identity groups do they belong to? How does the surrounding community currently use the park? Will your project augment that use or disrupt it? How will sound carry from your project out into the neighbourhood? What will neighbours see from their balconies or porches? Will the local community benefit from your project?  

Designing your project with the surrounding community in mind and directly inviting them to participate will mitigate tensions and help you avoid last-minute complaints from residents. If you want your project to be inclusive and welcoming, we advise assessing community needs while you’re still in the planning phase. What will participants need to comfortably and fully participate? Remember that your needs assessment shouldn’t only be about people you already work with, but also about the people you aspire to work with—whether that’s residents of a particular building, or a specific cultural group or age bracket.


 

Do you want more tools, tips and insights for creating your own community-engaged projects in public spaces? Visit Placing Parks to learn more and explore our project archive and toolkit! We hope Placing Parks helps you envision artful projects that bring people together in your local park! 

www.placingparks.ca

 

Now Hiring for a Community Arts Program Coordinator

Community Arts Program Coordinator

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Date Posted: December 27, 2018
Application Deadline: January 25, 2019 at 5pm
Start date: February 25, 2019
Salary: Full-time $45,000 - $ 50,000
Term: One-year contract with possibility of renewal

MABELLEarts is a community arts organization in Central Etobicoke that brings together people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities to make art and build environments that foster community regeneration, invention and connection. We cultivate long-term relationships that reveal the transformative possibilities within each unique site and neighbourhood. We celebrate cultural traditions, differences and points of connection that help spark collaboration as a creative force for change.

We are seeking an experienced Program Coordinator to manage our growing programs with a demonstrated interest in arts programming; a highly-responsible creative thinker and self-starter with experience working with professional artists and people of all ages from a range of cultural backgrounds; and demonstrates an understanding of the challenges faced by marginalized communities. The Program Co-ordinator will work from the MABELLEarts Office (5005 Dundas Street West) and off-site as needed.

Responsibilities of the Program Co-ordinator include:

1. Program Management and Implementation:

  • Under the leadership of the Artistic Director, implement program plans;

  • Devise and/or facilitate workshops and training;

  • Manage artistic team and identify, hire and manage additional consultants and trainers when needed;

  • Onboard new Community Leaders, youth participants and volunteers;

  • Make funding applications and develop program sponsorships;

  • Present verbal and written reports and represent MABELLEarts’ programs publicly.

2. Participant/Volunteer Outreach and Relationship Management:

  • Design, manage and evaluate all community outreach activities;

  • Recruit participants and maintain contact for all programs across the organization;

  • Maintain relationships with key Community Leaders and develop new relationships with emerging Leaders;

  • Match the skills, experiences and expectations of volunteers to available positions at MABELLEarts;

  • Develop policies, procedures and standards for volunteers using current resources as a springboard.

3. Office administration

  • Basic bookkeeping/coding and ordering office supplies

  • Maintain an organized and functional office and studio space

Our ideal candidate will have:

  • Demonstrated experience with community-engaged arts;

  • Experience working collaboratively with professional artists;

  • Strong engagement, facilitation, communication and group dynamic skills with culturally diverse groups including children, youth, adults and seniors;

  • 2+ years of demonstrated project management experience;

  • An understanding of the issues facing marginalized communities, including lived experience which will be viewed as an asset;

  • Experience building and maintaining positive relationships with community members of all ages and backgrounds;

  • Experience working intergenerationally and interculturally;

  • Post-secondary education in Environmental Studies Community Arts Practice program, Arts Management, Arts Administration, human services or equivalent combination of education and experience;

  • A high level of computer skills: proficiency in word, excel, database software and Adobe Suite;

  • A valid Ontario Drivers Licence is an asset to this position.

Please send a resume and cover letter to mugoli@mabellearts.ca by 5 pm, January 25, 2018. We thank you for your interest in the position. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

MABELLEarts encourages applications from all qualified candidates. We’re committed to developing an inclusive workplace with connections in the communities we serve. We encourage candidates from diverse backgrounds, including those who may need accommodation, to apply to join our team. Accommodations are available on request for candidates taking part in all aspects of the selection process.

Introducing placingparks.ca — our new digital toolkit!

This project archive and toolkit has been designed to help artists, funders and agencies develop community-engaged arts projects in parks and public spaces.

placingparks.ca includes a wealth of resources on how to initiate participatory art-making and community-building projects, build successful partnerships and think about park design and use with engagement goals in mind. The toolkit was created in the aftermath of Welcome To This Place. It draws both from MABELLEarts’ 11 years expertise as well as from learnings gathered over the course of our national project. The toolkit is available both in English and in French.

We thank Canadian Heritage for funding this exciting project, which was a joy to put together.

We hope Placing Parks helps you envision artful projects that bring people together in your local park!

Now Hiring for a Fall/Winter Intern

Community Arts Administrator Position

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Application Deadline: September 28, 2018, at 5pm
Start date: October 15, 2018
Salary: $20/hr for 30 hours/week
Term: Contract 24 weeks internship

MABELLEarts is a community arts organization that brings together people of all ages, backgrounds and abilities to make art and build environments that foster community regeneration, invention and connection. We cultivate long-term relationships that reveal the transformative possibilities within each unique site and neighbourhood. We celebrate cultural traditions, differences and points of connection that help spark collaboration as a creative force for change.

We are seeking an emerging Community Arts Administrator to join our team from October 15, 2018, to March 29, 2019, to coordinate all digital and written communications; assist with community communications and outreach; and support the running of the MABELLEarts office. The Community Arts Administrator will work from the MABELLEarts Office (5005 Dundas Street West) and off-site as needed.

Responsibilities of the Community Arts Administrator include:

  1. Digital and Written Communications:
    - Coordinating ongoing social media communications and creating online content, including a monthly newsletter;
    - Ongoing website maintenance and assistance in creating other web-based projects;
    - Graphic design of promotional, outreach and fundraising materials and assistance with grant applications and fundraising initiatives

  2. Community Communications and Outreach:
    - Assisting with participant outreach;
    - Assistance with project management and coordination of workshops and events;
    - Phone-calling and emailing participants in advance of all activities, statistical tracking and data-collection;
    - Collecting/filing completed permission/media-release forms/other documents, assisting with on-going meetings with community leaders/volunteers

  3. Office administration
    - Statistical reports, contact-management and database management
    - Basic bookkeeping/coding and ordering office supplies
    - Board correspondence, company communications (phone and email)
    - Volunteer intake
    - Maintaining a tidy office and organized studio space

Our ideal candidate will have:

- University or College degree in Arts Management or Arts Administration
- Other ideal degrees include: Bachelor of Environmental Studies with Community Arts Focus or comparable program; Bachelor degree in Theatre and Development or comparable program
- The candidate will possess a high level of computer skills: proficiency in word, excel and special consideration will be made to candidates with Quickbooks, Sumac, and/or Adobe suite proficiency.
- The candidate will demonstrate familiarity with social media networks in particular: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. A valid Ontario Drivers Licence is an asset to this position.

This position is funded by the Cultural Human Resources Council of Canada and is therefore subject to selection criteria outlined below. You are eligible if you:
- are a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident, or have refugee status in Canada (non-Canadians holding temporary work visas or awaiting permanent status are not eligible);
- are legally entitled to work in Canada;
- will be between 16 and 30 years of age at the start of employment;
- are willing to commit to the full duration of the work assignment;
- will not have another full-time job (over 30 hours a week) while employed with the program;
- are an unemployed or underemployed college or university graduate, that is, not employed full-time;
- are a recent graduate who has graduated from college or university within the last 24 months at the start of employment;
- will not be receiving Employment Insurance (EI) benefits while employed with the program; and
- have not previously participated in or been paid under this or any other Career Focus internship program funded under the Government of Canada's Youth Employment Strategy.

Please send a resume and cover letter to karen@mabellearts.ca by 5 pm, September 28, 2018. We thank you for your interest in the position. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

MABELLEarts encourages applications from all qualified candidates. We’re committed to developing an inclusive workplace with connections in the communities we serve. We encourage candidates from diverse backgrounds, including those who may need accommodation, to apply to join our team. Accommodations are available on request for candidates taking part in all aspects of the selection process.

How to find us in Broadacres Park

Broadacres Park is very big! The best way to find us in the park is to go to Broadacres Junior School at 45 Crendon Drive. Our location is in the park directly behind the school (see map below). (We do NOT recommend going to any other addresses on Google Maps that are listed for Broadacres Park).

TTC: 
- Take the subway to Kipling Station
- At Kipling, catch the 112c bus (toward Disco Road) - comes every 10 minutes
- Ride the bus 23 stops to 451 The West Mall
- Walk north on West Mall; turn left on Ulverston Road
- Turn left on Crendon Drive. Look out for Broadacres School
- Walk past one school parking lot. Turn into the second parking lot (on the south side of the school)
- Walk through the school parking lot into the park. 
- Look for MABELLEarts! 

Parking: is available in the Broadacres Jr. School parking lot (a 2 minute walk from our location)

If you have questions, don't hesitate to CONTACT us! 

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Join us for Welcome To This Place in Broadacres Park!

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MABELLEarts is pleased to welcome you to join us for an outdoor night market: a performative celebration of our summer in Broadacres Park, Mabelle Park and across the country. Come out enjoy an evening of exchanging stories, songs, delicious treats and more! Free! 

This event marks the culmination of the Toronto portion of Welcome to this Placea national project, produced by MABELLEarts, involving high-impact organizations and professional artists in Toronto, Montreal, Halifax, Winnipeg and Vancouver.  Together throughout the summer, we've been creating a series of collaborative projects and events that promote urban parks and public spaces as places of arrival where newcomers to Canada can find friendship, cultural and creative expression, connection to their new country and to more established Canadians. 

Directions to find us in Broadacres Park can be found HERE

Featured Artists: 

Waleed Abdulhamid
Aria Evans
Melanie Fernandez-Alvares
Faten Toubasi
Marianne Alas
Hussein Janmohamed
Aqua Nibii Waawaaskone
Alejandra Nunez
Samidha Joglekar
Latasha Lennox
The Gather Round Singers
Julia Tribe
Jamee Valin
and guest artists from across the country! 


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Announcing Welcome To This Place: our first national project!

 

MABELLEarts is pleased to announce our first national project: Welcome To This Place!

Welcome to this Place is a national project, produced by MABELLEarts, involving high-impact organizations and professional artists in Toronto, Montreal, Halifax, Winnipeg and Vancouver.  Together we're creating a series of collaborative projects and events that promote urban parks and public spaces as places of arrival where newcomers to Canada can find friendship, cultural and creative expression, connection to their new country and to more established Canadians. 

Follow along through July and August 2018, and be part of this national conversation on the promise of Canadian parks and public spaces as places of community connection and belonging.

Follow along   Suivez-nous: 

#WelcomeToThisPlace
www.welcometothisplace.ca


MABELLEarts a le plaisir d'annoncer notre premier projet national: Welcome to this Place!

Welcome to this Place est un projet national, produit par MABELLEarts, impliquant des associations à fort impact et des artistes professionnels à Toronto, Montréal, Halifax, Winnipeg et Vancouver. Ensemble, nous créons une série de projets et d'événements collaboratifs qui promeuvent des parcs urbains et des espaces publics comme des espaces d'arrivées où les nouveaux arrivants au Canada peuvent trouver l'amitié, l'expression culturelle et créative, le lien avec leur nouveau pays et les Canadiens plus établis.

Suivez notre voyage en juillet et août 2018 et participez à cette conversation nationale sur la promesse des parcs et espaces publics canadiens comme des lieux de connexion et d'appartenance communautaires.

Introducing the Artists: Iftar Nights in Mabelle Park

As we prepare for our final Iftar Night in Mabelle Park, we want to celebrate the incredible artists who have made this year's events possible. Our final Mabelle Iftar Night takes place on Thursday June 7th from 7-10pm in Mabelle Park. For more info look here

Full artistic team:  Hussein Janmohamed, Julia Tribe, Maryem Tollar with Turkwaz, Waleed Abdulhamid, Melanie Fernandez-Alvres, Michael Burtt, Ksenija Spasic, Samidha Joglekar, Faten Toubasi, Marianne Alas, Anahita Dehbonehie, and The Gather Round Singers

MABELLE Iftar Nights are generously supported by: Toronto Pearson, International Airport, Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Trillium Foundation, Ontario Arts Council, Toronto Arts Council, W. Garfield Weston Foundation, Theatre Ontario, Canadian Heritage, The Government of Ontario, The City of Toronto, Service Canada, Toronto Community Housing, Jumblies Theatre, Making Room Community Arts